flight paths

Definitely has more of an “adult audience” feel to it. There’s this sense of motion and moving along with the focus being very much so in the present. Especially intrigued by the way the last few episodes were presented when the body falls before the woman at the market onto her car and she’s unsure of what exactly to do, scanning the parking lot, and he asks if he’s dead. There’s this startling image of his impact on the car, this giant pause from all of the movement and this sense of a lack of sound and this frozenness, and then, as she slowly comes to terms with the situation, once again the movement starts. Strange how there’s this sense of drifting  throughout each episode yet there are so many shadows and still/hardly moving images. A dark feel to the design, and the format of the symbols linking each page is similar to the arrows used in Inanimate Alice. I felt rather distant from each character despite being told their fears (knowing they have to leave their families despite the notion of something new) or their roles (such as the mother in the supermarket as the one who fills the shelves) or having glimpses at their travels. I felt sort of lost as I floated through Flight Paths until that startling stop, and maybe that was the intention, maybe not. And now that our class has been introduced to the idea of immigration in relation to the piece, I can’t help but to be a little thrown off by the last episode when it’s revealed that the mother thinks only she can see the man, and the boy asks if he could play along. Still, the images and sounds and seemingly continual motion with an abrupt crash from the ‘dark mass’ all mix smoothly together, and our class’ sensation of “drifting” or “swimming” continues on.

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~ by sarahbartie on March 4, 2013.

2 Responses to “flight paths”

  1. I found this to be very well organized. Relating it back to other things we’ve read, while still keeping a priority focus on the assigned reading. As you talk about the imagery in which the “body falls before the woman at the market onto her car and she’s unsure of what exactly to do, scanning the parking lot, and he asks if he’s dead,” allows us to almost “re-see” what we saw while watching it prior to class. With the focus on an “adult audience,” and it’s “sense of motion” being within present times, it gives off this eerie feel in which we too are witnesses to these odd occurrences.

  2. ^Becca

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