Bonus Episode: Pittsburgh

Inanimate Alice is creepy. It is really creepy. The music combines with the premise to create a scenario where you feel very alone, and that nothing can help. You know that everything will be fine in the end, but the ride there will be intense. The idea of Inanimate Alice isn’t a very complex one, but it is done in such a way that it invites complexity in. Immersing the reader in the story is a good way to keep them reading. This web design has all of the essential material found in a video game (especially the later episodes) because it requires human interaction to continue its programming. It is designed to suck the reader in and immerse them in fantasy. This story intrigues me just as a suspenseful movie would. It has all of the characteristics of our modern media entertainment, and the characteristics of old-time point and click adventure games on the computer, which were the real beginnings to video games. Inanimate Alice is a precursor to our modern technology, released in modern day for the mass consumption.

 

Lewis Darnell

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~ by tiddles747 on March 3, 2013.

One Response to “Bonus Episode: Pittsburgh”

  1. This post works to describe two aspects of Inanimate Alice: the mechanics it employs, and the reactions they elicit. Lewis observes that Inanimate Alice uses its premise and music to “[make] you feel very alone” in a “really creepy” atmosphere. He also contextualizes Inanimate Alice as comparable to both a video game, with its interactive “characteristics of old-time point and click adventure games” inviting complexity and immersion. Lewis further describes these reactions in terms of the intrigued response elicited by a suspenseful movie. The post’s casual dicton, use of second person pronoun, and use of parenthetical statement conveys a moderately informal tone. This tone is broken by the more formal sounding concluding sentence that seems bent on briefly contextualizing Inanimate Alice’s level of technology and scale of distribution in the modern age.

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